How To Doodle A Cities Of Wonder Map — Toronto

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Jaq Jaq Bird Toronto Map GIF

How To Doodle A Cities of Wonder Map

Toronto

STEP #1 — JOT DOWN A LIST OF YOUR FAVORITE TORONTO LANDMARKS
Below includes a list of our top ten sites to see in Toronto!  You may not have space on your map to include too many handwritten notes; however, researching interesting facts about your favorite sites in Toronto may turn out to be a separate fun project in itself.

1.  CN TOWER
According to Mental Floss, Toronto's CN Tower is said to be one of the "Seven Wonders of the Modern World", and the glass floor of the observation level can withstand the weight of 35 moose.  At 553.33 m-high, it remains the tallest free standing structure in the Western Hemisphere.  "CN" refers to Canadian National, the railway company that originally built the tower.

2.  BATA SHOE MUSEUM
The Bata Shoe Museum has over 14,000 shoes from all over the world included in its collection.  Canadian architect, Raymond Moriyama, designed the museum to look like a shoebox.  One of the smallest shoes featured in the Bata Shoe Museum's collection is a pair of Ken doll sneakers.  BSM is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary, and you can learn more fun facts here.

3.  CASA LOMA
Known to be one of the most beautiful landmarks of Toronto, this Gothic Revival style castle was constructed from 1911 to 1914.  Casa Loma was the first house in Canada to have electricity, and it had so many telephones (total of 59) that the castle's switchboard operator handled more calls than the operator for the entire city of Toronto.  Learn more about Casa Loma and original owner, Sir Henry Pellatt here.

4.  GRAFFITI ALLEY
blogTO deems Graffiti Alley to be one of Toronto's most unexpected tourist attractions.  Over a half mile long, the entire stretch is covered with street art— consider it an open air gallery which showcases the vibrant and strong art culture that exists in Toronto.

5.  CITY HALL & NATHAN PHILLIPS SQUARE
In 1956, led by then Mayor Nathan Phillips, city leaders were looking to build a more modern city hall and held an international competition to select a new design.  The final structure was designed by Finnish architect, Viljo Revell.  The "New City Hall" is located in the heart of the city within Nathan Phillips Square.  Over 1.5 million visitors attend a variety of community and special events hosted at the Square each year.  

6.  NIAGARA FALLS & THE UPSIDE DOWN HOUSE
Known to be the world's fastest-moving waterfall, nearly 28 million liters (700,000 gallons) of water travel down Niagara Falls every single second.  Also known as the "Whoopsy House", the Upside Down House at Niagara Falls is a main attraction designed by two Polish men, Marek Cyran and Adam Neibvowicz, in 2012.

7.  RIVERDALE FARM
Riverdale Farm was built by the city of Toronto as a tribute to Ontario's small, family farm heritage.  It originally opened in 1978, and it is sure to provide modern day visitors with a first-hand taste of farm life.

8.  ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM
The buff-colored brick and terracotta west wing of the museum is the original structure designed; however, in 2007 the ROM opened the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal — an extraordinary $30 million gift which is the modern east wing structure.  Michael Lee-Chin was inspired by the ROM's unique mandate — to build bridges of understanding and appreciation for the world's diverse cultures and precious natural environments.

9.  HOCKEY HALL OF FAME
The Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto tops all sports Halls in annual attendance, welcoming over 300,000 guests every year.  The Hockey Hall of Fame is located in the former Bank of Montreal, built in 1885, which was the only building on the block to survive Toronto's Great Fire of 1904Learn more.

10.  501 QUEEN
National Geographic has named the 501 Queen streetcar route as one of the "Top 10 Trolley Rides" in the world.  The 501 is also known as "The Longest There Ever Was", as it is the longest surface transit route in North America, and it is one of the longest surface routes operating in the world.  Learn more about the 501 Queen here.


STEP #2 — REFERENCING A DIGITAL MAP OF TORONTO, LOOSELY PLOT OUT LOCATIONS OF YOUR FAVORITE LANDMARKS
No need to be perfect in your plotting, but sketching out an erasable grid and using an "x" to plot the locations of your landmarks on your paper are great starting points.
STEP #3 — DOODLE IN YOUR BEST LANDMARK ILLUSTRATIONS
Start with illustrating the place you want to visit first when you arrive to Toronto, and continue to doodle until you have replaced every "x" on your plot with a beautiful drawing that represents each top spot that you have selected.

Our Top Spots in TORONTO
Jaq Jaq Bird Toronto Landmarks

STEP #4 — WRITE IN YOUR TITLES
Label each of your chosen landmarks in your own handwriting, and don't forget to add the name of your city to your page in big, bold letters!

Labeling Our Landmarks + Adding Our Toronto Title
Jaq Jaq Bird Toronto Landmarks and Labels

STEP #5 — DOODLE IN ILLUSTRATIONS OF ICONIC FEATURES
Pick out the icons that best represent your ideas of Toronto city life (food, music, etc.) and doodle them onto the page using your imagination.

The maple leaf is the most widely recognized national symbol of Canada!
Jaq Jaq Bird Toronto Icons

STEP #6 — FINISH UP YOUR TORONTO MAP BY SKETCHING IN YOUR STREETS
Using the digital map from Step #2 as your reference, draw in the roads of Toronto, connecting each landmark as you doodle.  You can also fill in any negative space with greenery, such as the beautiful trees you see below throughout Toronto!

Taking in all of the sites, as we explore Toronto.
Jaq Jaq Bird Toronto

 SHARE YOUR DOODLE MAPS WITH US ON SOCIAL MEDIA BY TAGGING @JAQJAQBIRD
 
Jaq Jaq Bird's Cities of Wonder Erasable Book Collection allows children to trace and illustrate their travels, in-person or imaginary, all while learning to love the world around them.  Each book includes an educational, interactive map guide featuring landmarks, facts and more about the city. 
EXPLORE MORE FUN FACTS ABOUT TORONTO
art lesson birdfeed cities creativity unplugged free resources learning Toronto travel

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